Aug 27

(Source: sandandglass, via gameboyassassin)

thefrogman:

Scampipisca by Richard Sutton [flickr]
[h/t: misterwooff]
Aug 27

thefrogman:

Scampipisca by Richard Sutton [flickr]

[h/t: misterwooff]

Aug 27

neilsanders:

Over the past week I’ve been answering lots of messages about how to start out in learning animation. There’s a million easily accessible ways to start animating, but one of my favourite exercises is the 9 frame animated morph. Here’s a couple of examples freshly completed by my wonderful illustration students as a one lesson introduction to animation.

To start with everyone drew a simple image, then we arranged them in the best order to get silly transitions. I then photocopied each persons drawings so that everyone had their image and the image theirs was to morph into. We then traced off a breakdown pose and inbetweens which cushion to the first and last drawings to give them a nice ease in and out (see the above chart). We also used pegboards which I made myself to match the size of a standard 80mm hole punch to ensure that all of the drawings would line up with each other (it’s an illustration course and we only do a tiny amount of animation so there’s no justification for $700 hole punches).

Do any of you want one of these pegboards? I made a couple of hundred a few years ago but now I’m down to just enough for my classes, if there’s enough interest I could make another batch and sell them for a couple of bucks plus postage?

(via gameboyassassin)

rubyetc:

this wasn’t a request but on the theme of love and instinct..
Aug 25

rubyetc:

this wasn’t a request but on the theme of love and instinct..

labellefilleart:

The Hammock, James Tissot 
Aug 25

labellefilleart:

The Hammock, James Tissot 

(via casabet64)

Aug 25

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Katharina Roters

From Hungarian Cubes

In Hungarian Cubes, Roters documents those countryside row houses during Kádár’s reign, after residents started freewheeling with colors and shapes to make it so no two houses looked like. Roters noticed the painted “Magyar Kocka”, or Hungarian Cube, houses in 2003 after moving from Germany to a small Hungarian town. Some of the homes have trompe l’oeil paintings around the window, like facsimiles of shutters or trimming. Others look like abstracted images of sun rays, or harvested crops.

“Today you can buy a car you like, you can do everything you like. In this uniform world where people were not allowed to have some individuality, you had to wait for the same car as your neighbor,” Roters says. “The facade is what I can show to the outside to the world. This was a free space at this time where the people can show and express their individuality.”

Roters has spent years photographing the Magyar Kocka houses. She’s met some of the original owners, but also is watching as the Cube houses undergo renovations and new paint jobs. “The intellectual elite in Hungary they hate the kind of housing and the period and the ornamental decoration,” Roters says. InHungarian Cubes, she writes: “In the eyes of the rural population, these houses are simply no longer up-to-date and are therefore…these witnesses to a way of life are slowly but surely disappearing.” The houses are a relic of some rare individualism during a time of homogeneous, community-centric thinking. (by Margaret Rhodes)

Hungarian Cubes is available here, through Park Books.

Aug 25

(Source: bluecohosh, via ladyinarocknrollhell)


Chibiusa | BD134 [pixiv] 
Aug 25

Chibiusa | BD134 [pixiv] 

(Source: ugly-sobbing, via ladyinarocknrollhell)

Aug 25

(Source: just-other-wallflower, via ladyinarocknrollhell)

Aug 25

(Source: charleshuettner)